Simple Self-Care Strategies

Still Life of a cold - a mug of tea, classes, and tissues

It’s Just a Cold. . .

This week, I caught a “cold.” It presented as a sinus infection, likely viral, and fairly annoying if not completely debilitating. I think the added distress of this infection was that I haven’t had a “cold” in the last several years. I think I believed I was “immune” – but of course, I’m not.

yellow road trip van traverses an open road in a rocky desert

OMG, Road Trip(s)!

For those of you who lead “normal” lives – lives that aren’t built around the needs of other people with serious limitations – the idea of taking a road trip probably sounds entirely ordinary. But for a full-time caregiver (like me), the logistics associated with the notion of getting into a car, spending several hours in that confined space, transporting our life (with all the necessary belongings) to a hotel, spending the night, and enjoying a different expanse of scenery is entirely foreign!

An orange alarm block held up against a blue background

Where does the time go?

It’s Labor Day weekend which reminds me that we’ve reached the end of meteorological summer. And, of course, I ask myself, “Where did the summer go?” That’s because I can’t remember what I did with the time, how I used it, squandered it, enjoyed it, wasted it or invested it – it just vanished.

corner of a kitchen filled with dishes and clutter

What’s Standing in Your Way?

If you’ve been reading my Monday mailings regularly, you know that I tend to write to you about what I’m discovering in my own life because, after all, I’m on this journey with you. I’m quick to admit that my own life is a “work in progress” and happy to share the discoveries I’m making about my own challenges and foibles with you.

ying yang symbol of white and gold

Boiling Down the Tao

Over the last several weeks (5 to be exact) I’ve had a chance to take a course on the Tao Te Ching, a classic Chinese spiritual text authored some 2400 years ago, traditionally credited to the sage Lao-tzu (the founder of Taoism) who may have been a cluster of authors, not necessarily a single person.